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Rhymes with spoons

fuckindiva:

Be My Baby is a song by The Ronettes, released as a single in August 1963. It has had a substantial impact on popular music. Rolling Stone described the song as a “Rosetta stone for studio pioneers such as the Beatles and Brian Wilson”. Allmusic critic Jason Ankeny said: “No less an authority than Brian Wilson has declared ‘Be My Baby’ the greatest pop record ever made — no arguments here.” It was listed at #22 by Rolling Stone on its list of The 500 Greatest Songs of All Timex

Brian Wilson was totally right—there’s a reason the opening drum line has been recreated for so many other songs

(via now-in-glorious-technicolor)

theparisreview:

“The whole time, I kept thinking, so many girls read this when they’re kids—and get it. How could it take so long to catch up?”

Read this week’s staff picks, including finishing Jane Eyre after twenty-five years, James Boswell’s Life of Samuel Johnson, and overanalyzing The Shining.

I was one of those girls; I first read Jane Eyre when I was about 14, and still have the original Bantam edition that Mom bought for me at my middle school Scholastic book fair. It has a historically inaccurate portrait of Jane on the front, wearing a velvet purple dress and little boxy straw boater as if it were 1910 and not 1840. It was the first grown-up classical literature I’d ever really touched, and I remember that she told me I’d like it. Mom tends to go for pulp mysteries, so it’s a really surprising recommendation. Still—how awesome of her to have recognized what I would go for. I loved every second of it; so dramatic and in a strange, ancient style. People spoke in misarranged sentences and it took considerable thought to tease out what they were saying. 

" If the essence of creativity is linking disparate facts and ideas, then the more facility at your disposal, the better you’ll be at coming up with new ideas. "

- Joshua Foer, Moonwalking With Einstein

Ira Gershwin’s Sheaffer white dot fountain pen at a Library of Congress exhibit!

" DOMA’s principal effect is to identify a subset of state sanctioned marriages and make them unequal. The principal purpose is to impose inequality, not for other reasons like governmental efficiency. Responsibilities, as well as rights, enhance the dignity and integrity of the person. And DOMA contrives to deprive some couples married under the laws of their State, but not other couples, of both rights and responsibilities. By creating two contradictory marriage regimes within the same State, DOMA forces same-sex couples to live as married for the purpose of state law but unmarried for the purpose of federal law, thus diminishing the stability and predictability of basic personal relations the State has found it proper to acknowledge and protect. By this dynamic DOMA undermines both the public and private significance of state sanctioned same-sex marriages; for it tells those couples and all the world, that their otherwise valid marriages are unworthy of federal recognition. This places same-sex couples in an unstable position of being in a second-tier marriage. The differentiation demeans the couple, whose moral and sexual choices the Constitution protects, see Lawrence, 539 U. S. 558, and whose relationship the State has sought to dignify. And it humiliates tens of thousands of children now being raised by same-sex couples. The law in question makes it even more difficult for the children to understand the integrity and closeness of their own family and its concord with other families in their community and in their daily lives "

Azalea Festival.

I finished up the cat sweater that I’d promised to make for my cousin, and here is the finished look. I am very impressed that she managed to get him into it, but glad it fits! He looks very handsome.

Explanation of how to work a purl if it’s the first stitch on a DPN. It’s a tricky conundrum because purling as usual tends to situate the yarn so there’s almost a yarn-over in front of the purl. I spent a good bit of time last night Googling how to solve this problem and was surprised by how many times I saw advice that amounted to “just rearrange the stitches so you never have a purl at the start”.

So anyway, this is the most important piece of knitting advice I’ve ever found.